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Online learning during lockdown: The 3 things I’m most worried about

Online learning Australia

By Shahin Seker, Senior Education Consultant

If you’re a parent of a school-age child, you don’t need me to tell you that having your kids home doing online learning is really, really hard.

I’m trying my very best, but working from home and trying to control an extremely active son and make sure he actually learns something today is exhausting!

To be honest, I’ve spent a lot of sleepless nights worrying about these 3 things (and thinking about how I can take control … more on that further down!).

How online learning is affecting Australian kids

1. COVID learning loss

Even a very advanced student will not be able to learn as much at home. It’s just a fact. How much learning is my son really missing out on? He’s trying really hard, but will it be enough? Studies worldwide are already showing the negative effects of school closures on learning.

2. Self-esteem

It’s difficult for a child to develop a growth mindset when they’re working alone all the time. Students will naturally avoid difficult learning situations if they believe their effort will not pay off, and it’s really easy for this to happen without the structure of a physical classroom.

3. Memory and attention skills

Isolation and lockdown are now being linked to reduced memory and processing skills. Keeping kids on task with online learning is a huge challenge, and I worry that his cognitive skills will regress and he’ll struggle when the classrooms open again.

There are a lot of things that are out of my control. But there are some things I can control.

How I’m making the most of online learning to stop regression

Enrolling my son in a cognitive development program, which involves 30 minutes of training on the computer or iPad per day, means that he’s

  • fighting regression and moving forwards with his learning
  • engaged in structured learning every day
  • feeling good about himself because the program is adapting to him and rewarding his progress, and
  • improving his memory and attention skills so he’s ready when school goes back
LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR 6 WEEK LOCKDOWN PROGRAMS

How to fit cognitive training into your day

Here’s how some parents are scheduling their online learning day. Your schedule will depend on how your child sleeps and how many breaks he or she needs throughout the day.

SCHEDULE 1: Sonic Learning training before school starts

7:00 – 8:00 Breakfast and get ready
8:00 – 8:30 Sonic Learning training on the computer/iPad
8:40 – 12:00 Video meetings with teachers (with break for morning tea)
12:00 – 1:00 Lunch and free time
1:00 – 3:00 Schoolwork

SCHEDULE 2: Sonic Learning training to break up the day

7:30 – 8:30 Breakfast and get ready
8:40 – 12:00  Video meetings with teachers (with break for morning tea)
12:00 – 1:00 Lunch and free time
1:00 – 2:00 Schoolwork
2:00 – 2:30 Sonic Learning training on the computer/iPad
2:30 – 3:30 Schoolwork

SCHEDULE 3: Sonic Learning training after schoolwork

7:30 – 8:30 Breakfast and get ready
8:40 – 12:00 Video meetings with teachers (with break for morning tea)
12:00 – 1:00 Lunch and free time
1:00 – 3:00 Schoolwork
3:00 – 4:00 Free time
4:00 – 4:30 Sonic Learning training on the computer/iPad
Free phone consultation with a professional
This free telephone consultation can help to answer any questions you have about our services. At Sonic Learning we are all experienced teachers and health professionals so parents tend to find it very beneficial to be able to discuss their concerns and receive guidance from our team.

Yes please, book me in!